AssumptionMARY IS THE "SANCTA DEl GENITRIX,"

THE HOLY MOTHER OF GOD

 

"As soon as we apprehend by faith the great fundamental truth that Mary is the Mother of God, other wonderful truths follow in its train; and one of these is that she was exempt from the ordinary lot of mortals, which is not only to die, but to become earth to earth, ashes to ashes, dust to dust. Die she must, and die she did, as her Divine Son died, for He was man; but various reasons have approved themselves to holy writers, why, although her body was for a while separated from her soul and consigned to the tomb, yet it did not remain there, but was speedily united to her soul again, and raised by our Lord to a new and eternal life of heavenly glory

And the most obvious reason for so concluding is this - that other servants of God have been raised from the grave by the power of God, and it is not to be supposed that our Lord would have granted any such privilege to anyone else without also granting it to His own Mother.

We are told by St. Matthew, that after our Lord's death upon the Cross "the graves were opened, and many bodies of the saints that had slept" - that is, slept the sleep of death, "arose, and coming out of the tombs after His Resurrection, came into the Holy City and appeared to many St. Matthew says, "many bodies of the Saints" - that is, the holy Prophets, Priests, and Kings of former times - rose again in anticipation of the last day [Matt. 27:50-53.]

Can we suppose that Abraham, or David, or Isaias, or Ezechias, should have been thus favored, and not God's own Mother? Had she not a claim on the love of her Son to have what any others had? Was she not nearer to Him than the greatest of the Saints before her? And is it conceivable that the law of the grave should admit of relaxation in their case, and not in hers? Therefore we confidently say that our Lord, having preserved her from sin and the consequences of sin by His Passion, lost no time in pouring out the full merits of that Passion upon her body as well as her soul.

[Mary is called mother of God because of the nature of Christ. See ccc 466-469, 495]

 

MARY IS THE "MATER INTEMERATA,"

THE SINLESS MOTHER

 

ANOTHER consideration which has led devout minds to believe in the Assumption of our Lady into heaven after her death, without waiting for the general resurrection at the last day, is furnished by the doctrine of her Immaculate Conception.

By her Immaculate Conception is meant, that not only did she never commit any sin whatever, even venial, in thought, word, or deed, but further than this, that the guilt of Adam, or what is called original sin, never was her guilt, as it is the guilt attaching to all other descendants of Adam.

By her Assumption is meant that not only her soul, but her body also, was taken up to heaven upon her death, so that there was no long period of her sleeping in the grave, as is the case with others, even great Saints, who wait for the last day for the resurrection of their bodies.

One reason for believing in our Lady's Assumption is that her Divine Son loved her too much to let her body remain in the grave. A second reason - that now before us - is this, that she was not only dear to the Lord as a mother is dear to a son, but also that she was so transcendently holy, so full, so overflowing with grace. Adam and Eve were created upright and sinless, and had a large measure of God's grace bestowed upon them; and, in consequence, their bodies would never have crumbled into dust, had they not sinned; upon which it was said to them, "Dust thou art, and unto dust thou shalt return." If Eve, the beautiful daughter of God, never would have become dust and ashes unless she had sinned, shall we not say that Mary, having never sinned, retained the gift which Eve by sinning lost? What had Mary done to forfeit the privilege given to our first parents in the beginning? Was her comeliness to be turned into corruption, and her fine gold to become dim, without reason assigned? Impossible. Therefore we believe that, though she died for a short hour, as did our Lord Himself, yet, like Him, and by His Almighty power, she was raised again from the grave.

[Mary was given the grace of baptism from her earliest moment and this grace helped her to remain sinless. CCC 493-494. We should not be surprised at her virtue because of our modern understanding of the vital role of parents in childhood development. Jesus who is truly man as well as God had to have his human self grow and develop in the same way as all people. If Jesus were raised by a sinful mother could he have been the Christ, the New Adam?]

 

MARY IS THE "ROSA MYSTICA,"

THE MYSTICAL ROSE

 

 

Mary is the most beautiful flower that ever was seen in the spiritual world. It is by the power of God's grace that from this barren and desolate earth there have ever sprung up at all flowers of holiness and glory And Mary is the Queen of them. She is the Queen of spiritual flowers; and therefore she is called the Rose, for the rose is fitly called of all flowers the most beautiful.

But moreover, she is the Mystical, or hidden Rose; for mystical means hidden. How is she now "hidden" from us more than are other saints? What means this singular appellation, which we apply to her specially? The answer to this question introduces us to a third reason for believing in the reunion of her sacred body to her soul, and its assumption into heaven soon after her death, instead of its lingering in the grave until the General Resurrection at the last day.

It is this: if her body was not taken into heaven, where is it? how comes it that it is hidden from us? why do we not hear of her tomb as being here or there? why are not pilgrimages made to it? why are not relics producible of her, as of the saints in general? Is it not even a natural instinct which makes us reverent towards the places where our dead are buried? We bury our great men honorably St. Peter speaks of the sepulcher of David as known in his day [Acts 2:29], though he had died many hundred years before. When our Lord's body was taken down from the Cross, He was placed in an honorable tomb. Such too had been the honor already paid to St. John Baptist, his tomb being spoken of by St. Mark as generally known. Christians from the earliest times went from other countries to Jerusalem to see the holy places. And, when the time of persecution was over, they paid still more attention to the bodies of the Saints, as of St. Stephen, St. Mark, St. Barnabas, St. Peter, St. Paul, and other Apostles and Martyrs. These were transported to great cities, and portions of them sent to this place or that. Thus, from the first to this day it has been a great feature and characteristic of the Church to be most tender and reverent towards the bodies of the Saints. Now if there was anyone who more than all would be preciously taken care of, it would be our Lady Why then do we hear nothing of the Blessed Virgin's body and its separate relics? Why is she thus the hidden Rose? Is it conceivable that they who had been so reverent and careful of the bodies of the Saints and Martyrs should neglect her - her who was the Queen of Martyrs and the Queen of Saints, who was the very Mother of our Lord? It is impossible. Why then is she thus the hidden Rose? Plainly because that sacred body is in heaven, not on earth."

[See The tomb of Mary in the 1913 Catholic Encyclopedia, which also has an article on the assumption written before the doctrine was infallibly defined by Pius XII. See CCC 966.

Father Clifford Stevens reports that the tradition of no relics and Mary's assumption is very ancient. "What was clear from the beginning was that there were no relics of Mary to be venerated, and that an empty tomb stood on the edge of Jerusalem near the site of her death. That location also soon became a place of pilgrimage. (Today, the Benedictine Abbey of the Dormition of Mary stands on the spot.)

At the Council of Chalcedon in 451, when bishops from throughout the Mediterranean world gathered in Constantinople, Emperor Marcian asked the Patriarch of Jerusalem to bring the relics of Mary to Constantinople to be enshrined in the capitol. The patriarch explained to the emperor that there were no relics of Mary in Jerusalem, that "Mary had died in the presence of the apostles; but her tomb, when opened later . . . was found empty and so the apostles concluded that the body was taken up into heaven."]

[For more, you can see the Meditation on the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin.]


Cardinal John Henry Newman, Meditations and Devotions, from Prayers, Verses and Devotions, Ignatious Press, pp. 164-169. Meditations and Devotions was originally published in 1903 by Longmans, Green and Co., N.Y. The reprint by Ignatious Press is copyrighted in 2000. Except for the material in brackets and the replacement of archaic spelling, the text above is as printed in the Ignatious Press edition.

The image of the Assumption is by Don Silvestro Dei Gherarducci (1339-1399).

The above text and image is presented here for religious and educational purposes only. No other use is intended or permitted. See, 17 USC 107.


Cardinal Newman 8 Day Meditation.

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